Wednesday, 19 September 2018

Frieze London Sculpture Park


To Regent's Park once again for Frieze sculpture which was very popular when I visited due in no small part to the fantastic weather we experienced over the summer. The sculptures were the usual mixed bag in terms of quality and ambition, but the event remains a great chance for the general public to experience and engage with fairly accessible art unlike the excesses of the Frieze fair itself. Highlights were this gigantic bronze, and the preponderance of birds this year including that giant penguin.

Bhati Kher - The Intermediary Family, 2018


Richard Woods - Holiday Home (Regent's Park), 2018
 

Kiki Smith - Seer (Alice I), 2005

Simon Periton - Outdoor Miner, 2018

Yoan Capote - Stress, 2004


Kathleen Ryan - il Volatile, 2018

Rana Begum - No. 814, 2018


Elmgreen & Dragset - Si par une nuit d'hiver un voyageur, 2017


Sean Scully - Shadow Stack, 2018


Haroon Gunn-Salie - Senzenina, 2018


Virginia Overton - Untitled (122 x 244 View), 2018

Larry Achiampong - PAN AFRICAN FLAGS FOR THE RELIC TRAVELLERS' ALLIANCE, 2018



Rachel Feinstein - Corine, Mezzetino, Chinoisie, 2018



James Capper - TREADPAD B - PAIR ONE WALKING SHIP 150 TON STANDARD DISPLACEMENT 4 LEG (DIA 1800), 2018 


Hugo Wilson - Pact, 2017-2018


Conrad Shawcross - Optic Labyrinth (Arrangement I), 2018


Dan Graham - London Rococo, 2012


Laura Ford - Dancing Clog Girls I-III, 2015


Tim Etchells - Everything Is Lost, 2018


Barry Flanagan, Large Nijinsky on Anvil Point, 2001



Tracey Emin - A Moment Without You, 2017



Michele Mathison - Parallax, 2018

Kimsooja - A Needle Woman - Galaxy Was a Memory, Earth is a Souvenir, 2014


John Baldessari - Penguin, 2018






Frieze Sculpture Park 
until 7th October
English Garden
Regent's Park
London

Saturday, 15 September 2018

Cornelia Parker: Transitional Object (PsychoBarn)


I was walking past the Royal Academy and was literally stopped in my tracks as I came across the installation of this arresting sculpture in the courtyard. It is Cornelia Parker's Transitional Object (PsychoBarn). Originally commissioned and created for the Roof Garden space of the Met museum in New York during 2016.




It is inspired by, and meant to evoke the spirit of icons of classic American architecture such as red barns, the vernacular architure in Edward Hopper paintings, and the Bates Motel building from the 1960 Hitchcock classic, Psycho, (itself based on buildings found in Hopper's paintings). 

 Bates Motel - Psycho

 A classic American red barn

Edward Hopper - House By The Railroad, 1925
 
(I was lucky enough to see this painting in Paris last year on a rare European outing from MOMA, its American home here).




The sculpture is created from actual found and reclaimed elements of a real American red barn, reassembled to create a fantastic structure. All is not what it appears to be however, as Parker has created a clever illusion which you discover when you venture around the PsychoBarn...





The installation again references Psycho, as seen from the rear, in that it resembles a stage set and building facade used on countless movie lots. There is something incongruous and almost surreal about the transposition of PsychoBarn to this setting, but at the same time it is an installation that fits perfectly into its temporary RA Annenberg courtyard locale, echoing the classical architecture of the Royal Academy itself.





Cornelia Parker: Transitional Object (PsychoBarn)
from 18th September
Annenberg Courtyard
Burlington House
Royal Academy of Arts
London